All in Medicine

Episode 44: Our Cric Show

We talk about a wide variety of all things cricothyroidotomy: mental prep and training, the difference in the techniques that are out there, which one might work better, and lots of other stuff. We also shoutout to a LOT of other resources that will help you to really understand this low frequency, but critical procedure.

If this is in your scope of practice; or possibly in a situation where a clinician will use this; you need to know about this to be able to care for your patient.

Dr. Rich Levitan’s website:

https://www.airwaycam.com

Dr. Scott Weingart’s website:

https://emcrit.org

The EMCrit podcast can be found on iTunes (just like us!)…it’s one of the best around with literally hundreds of topics!

SMACC was an amazing prehospital/emergency/and critical care conference that changed how many of us looked at conferences and learning. Check out their stuff here:

https://smacc.net.au/blog/

New England Journal of Medicine paper on comparing cric techniques:

https://www.jwatch.org/em200503300000002/2005/03/30/open-cricothyroidotomy-vs-seldinger-technique

Here’s the case study about the NG tube going into the spinal column…

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0196070911000755

Episode 39: The National Registry

The National Registry…what is it, and why should it matter to you? As the only national organization of credentialing in the USA, the guidelines and structure they use has a huge impact on your license or certification.

We dig into the Overrun vault to find this episode….let us know what YOU think!

Is NREMT the be-all, end-all solution; or can it be improved to be a truly national licensing standard? We look at the strengths and weaknesses, and what we would like to see from the NREMT!

The National Registry of EMTs is at:

https://www.nremt.org/rwd/public

Episode 36-Sepsis and Prehospital Care

Ed, Jess, and Dan discuss where we've been with sepsis, where we are, and maybe where we're going. Fluids, pressers, scoring....there's a LOT of information out there, and we try to sort through it for you

The Early Goal-Directed Therapy paper from 2001:

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa010307

Listen to Dr. Weingart (@emcrit) tale with the author himself in a two-part interview:

Podcast 054 – Dr. Rivers on Severe Sepsis – Part I

https://emcrit.org/emcrit/rivers-sepsis-i/

Copy and paste this URL into your WordPress site to embed

Podcast 055 – Dr. Rivers on Severe Sepsis – Part II

https://emcrit.org/emcrit/rivers-sepsis-ii/

Center for Disease Control sepsis information:

https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/clinicaltools/index.html

Dutch PHANTASi trial:

https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lanres/PIIS2213-2600(17)30469-1.pdf

Episode 35-The Last Frontier with Dave Aromin

Dan sits down with flight paramedic Dave Aromin to discuss the amazing state of Alaska, and the challenges of providing emergency and retrieval care to the largest state. We discuss the logistics involved in his area, the unique clinical practice involved, and the people who take on this role in one of the most unforgiving environments in the United States and the world.

The EMS community in Alaska suffered a huge blow with the loss of a Guardian Flight fixed-wing crew on January 29, 2019, when their aircraft crashed and all aboard, including a patient were lost. There has been memorial and scholarship funds established for the families of the Guardian Flight crew, and they can be found at the following links:

https://www.customink.com/fundraising/guardianflightalaska


https://www.echoheliops.org/stacie-morse-education-scholarship

This episode is presented in the memories of:

Pilot Patrick Coyle

Flight Paramedic Margaret Langston

Flight Nurse Stacie Rae Morse

and the patient who they were caring for on their last mission.

Episode 30-Mental Health and Heroism

The gang goes back to mental health, and post-traumatic stress. Anna takes the lead in discussing the FIRST program for clinicians to address and work with stress on the job.

We discuss the idea of heroism, the concept of "toxic heroism", and maybe how we should look at honor, rather than being a "hero" as a way to move forward in the profession.

There's also random comments about being generally maladjusted, as only we can do...

Check out Yoga for First Responders here:

www.yogaforfirstresponders.org